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HUMAN AMYLOID IMAGING CONFERENCE

January 17-19, 2018
Miami, Florida

HISTORY


HAI ACROSS TIME

The first HAI was held in Boston in April 2007. This initial meeting was quickly organized, but drew considerable interest from about a dozen laboratories in the US, UK, Europe, and Japan. Registration was done online with no fee, and there were approximately 150 attendees. The meeting format of brief talks and abundant discussion was immediately recognized as a success. The reason for its continued success is probably that speakers are asked to omit basic background slides, which consume so much time at most meetings, and present for only seven minutes. Then, after each talk, discussion is led by the Chairs and includes active audience participation. This has succeeded because, unlike larger gatherings with much less time for discussion, each point of discussion is given time for consideration by several participants. With sufficient time, detailed answers (or explanations of non-answers) can be aired and clarified by those who often have substantial recent experience with a given issue. Our first Keynote speakers were Drs. Dennis Selkoe and Bradley Hyman from Boston.

In the following five years, the basic format of sessions and talks was retained, but we began to see new forms of data, such as longitudinal studies and an ever-increasing body of neuropathologic correlational data. In 2011, the HAI was held as a stand-alone, two-day meeting that was independent of the AAN/ADRC/ADNI meetings. Attendance was approximately 200 and the results of the post-event survey distributed to attendees substantiated the fact that the interest level exhibited by the community could sustain the new two-day format.  Starting with 2012, the HAI successfully continued this structure (continuously adding more registrants, counting closer to 350 in 2015) and appended a welcome reception that allowed attendees to expand on their networking time.  In 2016, 2017 and 2018, the meeting had an additional half-day focusing on advances in tau PET which was piloted in our 2015 edition.

CO-CONVENERS

KEITH A. JOHNSON, MD

KEITH A. JOHNSON, MD

Keith A. Johnson, MD, is Professor of Radiology and Neurology at the Harvard Medical School. He is also Associate Radiologist and the Director of Molecular Neuroimaging in the Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Department of Radiology) at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Dr. Johnson also serves as an associate physician and staff neurologist in the Memory Disorders Unit at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital as well as a Clinical Associate in Neurology at the MGH.

Dr. Johnson is co-director of the Neuroimaging Program of the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and its Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) research initiatives. He oversees the Clinical Brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Service at the MGH and also practices as a neurologist specializing in neurodegenerative disorders.

Dr. Johnson’s major research interests include normal brain aging and the early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and dementia with Lewy bodies

WILLIAM J. JAGUST, MD

WILLIAM J. JAGUST, MD

William J. Jagust, MD, is Professor of Public Health and Neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley. Research in his lab is aimed at understanding the structural, functional and biochemical basis of brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases associated with brain aging.

Dr. Jagust uses techniques of positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional MRI, and neuropsychology and cognitive neuroscience to study normal older people, and patients with neurodegenerative disorders of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and Parkinson’s disease. Studies are using PET imaging to detect the deposition of brain amyloid, and we are also looking at how changes in neurotransmitters are related to behavioral changes in aging.

His research focus includes early detection of Alzheimer-related changes with PET and MRI scanning, using imaging to track treatments in both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, and understanding the fundamental mechanisms of cognitive change in the aging brain

WILLIAM KLUNK, MD, PhD

WILLIAM KLUNK, MD, PhD

William E. Klunk, MD, PhD, is co-director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center at UPMC and professor of psychiatry and neurology at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Klunk is a pioneer in the field of in vivo amyloid imaging in humans. His work spans from basic synthetic chemistry and neuropharmacological evaluation of amyloid imaging tracers to human positron emission tomography (PET) studies of these tracers. His group’s paper on imaging the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, published in January 2004, is the most frequently cited research paper on this disease. Dr. Klunk also was a member of the Pitt team that invented the groundbreaking Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB).

Dr. Klunk is a member of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Council of the National Alzheimer’s Association and has published over 100 journal articles and book chapters. He is principal investigator of several National Institutes of Health and foundation grants and has received a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Aging.

CHESTER MATHIS

CHESTER MATHIS

Chester Mathis, PhD, has a long-standing interest in applying synthetic radiochemistry techniques to develop PET radiopharmaceuticals to study brain function in vivo. Over the past 25 years, he has focused primarily on the development of radiotracers to image the serotonin and dopamine neuroreceptor systems, as well as agents to evaluate other aspects of normal and abnormal function in the central nervous system using PET imaging techniques. Approximately 10 years ago, Dr. Mathis joined efforts with Dr. William E. Klunk of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh to devise a PET radiotracer capable of imaging amyloid. This work led to the development of a new class of highly successful radiopharmaceutical agents, among which is Pittsburgh Compound-B, to non-invasively assess amyloid load in the living human brain using PET imaging methodology.

As the Director of the University of Pittsburgh PET Facility, Dr. Mathis works closely with more than 25 University of Pittsburgh investigators from 8 departments on more than 70 PET research imaging protocols in animals and human subjects. These projects include neuroscience, diabetes, and oncology research studies using more than 40 different PET radiotracers to image a variety of biological processes in animals and human subjects.

HAI 2018 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Thomas Beach, MD, PhD, Banner Health
Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis
Nenad Bogdanovic, PhD, University of Oslo
Gael Chetelat, PhD, INSERM/University of Caen Basse-Normandie
Brad Christian, PhD, University of Wisconsin
Teresa Gomez-Isla, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
Roger Gunn, PhD, Imperial College
Kenji Ishii, MD, Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology
Milos Ikonomovic, MD, University of Pittsburgh
Clifford R. Jack, MD, Mayo Clinic
Robert A. Koeppe, PhD, University of Michigan
Mark Lubberink, PhD, Uppsala University
Beth Mormino, PhD, Stanford University
Melissa Murray, PhD, Mayo Clinic
Agneta Nordberg, PhD, Karolinska Institute
Rik Ossenkoeppele, PhD, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam
Denise Park, PhD, University of Texas
Julie Price, PhD, Harvard Medical School
Gil Rabinovici, MD, University of California, San Francisco
Susan Resnick, PhD, National Institute on Aging
Juha Rinne, MD, PhD, University of Turku
Sandra Sanabria, PhDGenentech
Reisa Sperling, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Victor Villemagne, MD, The University of Melbourne
Sylvia Villeneuve, PhD, McGill University

HAI 2018 THEME CO-CHAIRS

Brad Christian, PhD, University of Wisconsin
Milos Ikonomovic, MD, University of Pittsburgh
Beth Mormino, PhD, Stanford University
Melissa Murray, PhD, Mayo Clinic
Julie Price, PhD, Harvard Medical School
Gil Rabinovici, MD, University of California, San Francisco

HAI 2017 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhDWash. Univ. in St. Louis
Brad Christian, PhD, University of Wisconsin
Kenji Ishii, MDTokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology
Milos Ikonomovic, MD, University of Pittsburgh
Clifford R. Jack, MDMayo Clinic
Robert A. Koeppe, PhDUniversity of Michigan
Beth Mormino, PhDHarvard Medical School
Melissa Murray, PhDMayo Clinic
Agneta Nordberg, PhDKarolinska Institute
Denise C. Park, PhDUniversity of Texas
Julie Price, PhDHarvard Medical School
Gil Rabinovici, MDUniv. of California, San Francisco
Susan M. Resnick, PhDNational Institute on Aging
Juha O. Rinne, MD, PhDUniversity of Turku
Reisa Sperling, MDBrigham and Women’s Hospital
Victor Villemagne, MDThe University of Melbourne

 

HAI 2017 THEME CO-CHAIRS

Brad Christian, PhD, University of Wisconsin
Milos Ikonomovic, MD, University of Pittsburgh
Beth Mormino, PhD, Stanford University
Melissa Murray, PhD, Mayo Clinic
Julie Price, PhD, Harvard Medical School
Gil Rabinovici, MD, University of California, San Francisco

HAI 2016 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis
Kenji Ishii, MD, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology
Clifford R. Jack, MD, Mayo Clinic
Robert A. Koeppe, PhD, University of Michigan
Agneta Nordberg, PhD, Karolinska Institutet
Denise C. Park, PhD, University of Texas
Gil Rabinovici, MD, University of California, San Francisco
Susan M. Resnick, PhD, National Institute on Aging
Juha O. Rinne, MD, PhD, University of Turku
Christopher Rowe, MD, The University of Melbourne
Reisa Sperling, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Victor Villemagne, MD, The University of Melbourne

HAI 2015 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Kenji Ishii, MD, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology
Clifford R. Jack, MD, Mayo Clinic
Robert A. Koeppe, PhD, University of Michigan
Denise C. Park, PhD, University of Texas
Susan M. Resnick, PhD, National Institute on Aging
Juha O. Rinne, MD, PhD, University of Turku
Christopher Rowe, MD, Austin Health
Reisa Sperling, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

HAI 2014 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Kenji Ishii, MD, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology
Clifford R. Jack, MD, Mayo Clinic
Robert A. Koeppe, PhD, University of Michigan
Denise C. Park, PhD, University of Texas
Susan M. Resnick, PhD, National Institute on Aging
JuhaO. Rinne, MD, PhD, University of Turku
Christopher Rowe, MD, Austin Health
Reisa Sperling, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

HAI 2013 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Kenji Ishii, MD, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology
Clifford R. Jack, MD, Mayo Clinic
Robert A. Koeppe, PhD, University of Michigan
Denise C. Park, PhD, University of Texas
Susan M. Resnick, PhD, National Institute on Aging
JuhaO. Rinne, MD, PhD, University of Turku
Christopher Rowe, MD, Austin Health
Reisa Sperling, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

HAI 2012 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Kenji Ishii, MD, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology
Clifford R. Jack, MD, Mayo Clinic
Robert A. Koeppe, PhD, University of Michigan
Denise C. Park, PhD, University of Texas
Susan M. Resnick, PhD, National Institute on Aging
JuhaO. Rinne, MD, PhD, University of Turku
Christopher Rowe, MD, Austin Health
Reisa Sperling, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

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