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HUMAN AMYLOID IMAGING CONFERENCE

January 16-18, 2019
Miami, Florida

2019 PROGRAM

The 2019 Program will be posted on or around December 7, 2018.

All info on the conference including the program is also accessible from the HAI 2019 mobile app (from your smartphone, access https://my.yapp.us/HAICONF).

The event will be held at the Miami Beach Resort.  Access to all sessions, meals, networking receptions will require a conference badge.  Please review additional Attendee FAQ.

Until later this year, please review the 2018 Program below:

2018 PROGRAM

Wednesday, January 17, 2018
11:00 amCheck-in (Grande Promenade Foyer)
11:45Welcome NotesKeith Johnson
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US
12:00 pmSESSION 1: Methods and analysisCHAIRS:
Bradley Christian, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, US
Sandra Sanabria, Genentech, South San Francisco, CA, US
12:00Serial measurements with Rousset-Style (GTM) PVC are less precise than with traditional approachesChristopher Schwarz, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, US
12:15Modeling amyloid, tau, and cortical thickness changes across the Alzheimer's disease spectrumJungho Cha, University of California, San Francisco, CA, US
12:30Amyloid load - a more sensitive outcome measure for quantifying amyloid-betaRoger Gunn, Invicro, London, United Kingdom
12:45Data-driven tau-PET covariance networks enhance associations with cognition in Alzheimer's disease.Jacob Vogel, Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada
1:00Regional tau elevation patterns in clinically normal adults using sparse k-means clustering
Kirsten Moody, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, US
1:15Evaluation of visual interpretation methods for tau PET imaging
Ida Sonni, University of California, Berkeley, CA, US
1:30Discussion Session 1
2:00POSTER SESSION 1 and Coffee Break
3:30SESSION 2: New tracersCHAIRS:
Chester Mathis, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, US
Roger Gunn, Invicro, London, UK
3:30PET imaging of synaptic density in Alzheimer's diseaseMing-Kai Chen, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, US
3:45Characterizing the relationship of [18F]GTP1 (Genentech tau probe 1) PET imaging with Alzheimer's disease pathophysiologySandra Sanabria, Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA, US
4:00A head-to-head comparison between [11C]PBB3 and [18F]PM-PBB3 in patients with AD and non-AD tauopathy
Manabu Kubota, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan
4:15Clinical evaluation of 18F-PI-2620, a next generation tau PET agent in subjects with Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsyAndrew Stephens, Piramal Imaging, Berlin, Germany
4:30Discussion Session 2
5:00SESSION 3: MK-6240CHAIRS:
Julie Price, ‎Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US
Robert Koeppe, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, US
5:00Clinical validation of the novel PET tracer [18F]MK6240 for in vivo quantification of neurofibrillary tanglesPedro Rosa-Neto, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
5:15Test-retest characterization and pharmacokinetic properties of [18F]MK-6240Cristian Salinas, Biogen, Cambridge, MA, US
5:30In vivo observations and quantification of tau with [F-18]MK-6240 PET from young controls to Alzheimer's diseaseTobey Betthauser, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, US
5:45Tau imaging in Alzheimer's disease with 18F-MK6240, a second generation selective tau tracerChristopher Rowe, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia
6:00Discussion Session 3
6:30-8:30Welcome Reception
Thursday, January 18, 2018
7:30amCheck-in (Grande Promenade Foyer) and Breakfast (Starlight Ballrooom - 18th Floor)
8:30SESSION 4: Pathological correlatesCHAIRS:
Melissa Murray, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, US
Milos Ikonomovic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, US
8:30Autoradiographic evaluation of MK-6240 compared to AV-1451Val Lowe, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, US
8:45In vivo and in vitro [18F]MK6240 show neurofibrillary tangles deposition heterogeneity in individuals with a wide range of cognitive symptoms
Tharick Pascoal, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
9:00Multi-site study of PiB-PET imaging using the Centiloid method: relationships to pathological measures of beta-amyloid pathologyRenaud La Joie, University of California, San Francisco, CA, US
9:15[F-18]-AV-1451 binding profile in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: a postmortem case seriesCinthya Aguero Murillo, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US
9:30Neuropathological and biochemical correlates of tau and amyloid PET imaging in two autopsy brainsMilos Ikonomovic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, US
9:45Discussion Session 4
10:15POSTER SESSION 2A and Coffee Break
11:00Keynote Lecture:
Network-based neurodegeneration

(This lecture will be recorded)
William Seeley, University of California, San Francisco, CA, US
11:30Keynote Discussion
11:45SESSION 5: Genetically determined Alzheimer's diseaseCHAIRS:
Eric McDade, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, MO, US
William Klunk, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, US
11:45Genetic and environmental factors are differentially related to ABeta burden in the presymptomatic phase of autosomal dominant and sporadic Alzheimer's diseaseJulie Gonneaud, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
12:00 pmIn vivo measurements of cortical thickness, amyloid and tau pathology, and episodic memory in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's diseaseYakeel Quiroz, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, US
12:15Comparison of striatal longitudinal changes in amyloid deposition in non-demented elderly and Down syndromeDana Tudorascu, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, US
12:30[F-18]AV-1451 PET in non-demented adults with Down Syndrome is related to both amyloid and ageAnn Cohen, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, US
12:45Baseline amyloid PET and longitudinal change in non-amyloid biomarkers from the DIAN StudyEric McDade, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, MO, US
1:00Discussion Session 5
1:30Lunch
2:45SESSION 6: Amyloid and tau: correlations with patient characteristics and CSFCHAIRS:
Oskar Hansson, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Agneta Nordberg, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
2:45Genotype-dependent longitudinal trajectories of brain metabolism and cognition in autosomal dominant AD
Elena Rodriguez-Vieitez, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
3:00Coupling between amyloid and tau occurs at a younger age in APOE E4 carriers than in non-carriers
Heidi Jacobs, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, US
3:15Greater tau load and reduced cortical thickness in the parietal cortex of APOE ε4 negative AD patientsNiklas Mattsson, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
3:30Sex-specific effects on cognitive decline in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: findings from ADNI, AIBL and HABSRachel Buckley, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, US
3:45Distinct information from CSF tau and AV1451 PET measures in nondemented individualsElizabeth Mormino, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, US
4:00Abnormal CSF ABeta changes do not reliably precede florbetapir-PET increases in ABeta-negative normals followed longitudinallySusan Landau, University of California, Berkeley, CA, US
4:15Discussion Session 6
4:45Tau Consortium Announcement
4:50POSTER SESSION 2B and Coffee Break
5:35 - 7:30Networking Reception
Friday, January 19, 2018
7:30amCheck-in (Grande Promenade Foyer) and Breakfast (Starlight Ballrooom - 18th Floor)
8:30SESSION 7: Staging and longitudinal studiesCHAIRS:
Keith Johnson, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US
Reisa Sperling, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, US
8:30Longitudinal tau-PET in aging and Alzheimer's diseaseClifford Jack, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, US
8:45Longitudinal [18F]-AV-1451 tau-PET scans in healthy older adults and Alzheimer's diseaseTheresa Harrison, University of California, Berkeley, CA, US
9:00Where matters most: regional amyloid deposition predict progression from preclinical to prodromal stages of Alzheimer's diseaseGerard Bischof, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
9:15In-vivo staging of regional amyloid deposition: evidence for validity and clinical significance from two independent cohort studiesMichel Grothe, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Rostock, Germany
9:30Predictors of regional AV1451 uptake in non-demented older adultsMurat Bilgel, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, US
9:45Discussion Session 7
10:15POSTER SESSION 3A and Coffee Break
11:00SESSION 8: Applications in clinical populationsCHAIRS:
Gil Rabinovici, University of California, San Francisco, CA, US
Rik Ossenkoppele, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
11:00Impact of the appropriate use criteria: effect of amyloid imaging on diagnosis and patient management in an unselected memory clinic cohort: the ABIDE projectArno de Wilde, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
11:15The influence of age at onset on regional [18F]AV-1451 uptake in atypical Alzheimer's diseaseJennifer Whitwell, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, US
11:30Hemispheric asymmetry on structural MRI, [18F]AV-1451-PET, and [11C]PIB-PET across clinical phenotypes of Alzheimer's diseaseAdrienne Visani, University of California, San Francisco, CA, US
11:45Detection of tau pathology in Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker Disease (PRNP F198S) by [18F]Flortaucipir PETShannon Risacher, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, US
12:00pmFDG-PET in tau-negative amnestic dementia resembles that of autopsy proven hippocampal sclerosisHugo Botha, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, US
12:15Discussion Session 8
12:45Lunch
2:00Keynote Lecture:
Molecular, temporal and spatial aspects of tau pathology

(This lecture will be recorded)
Peter Davies, Northwell Health, Great Neck, NY, US
2:30Keynote Discussion
2:45SESSION 9: Early detection and predictionCHAIRS:
William Jagust, University of California, Berkeley, CA, US
Elizabeth Mormino, Standford University, Stanford, CA, US
2:45Early detection of longitudinal amyloid-related cognitive decline in middle-aged and initially amyloid-negative adultsMichelle Farrell, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, US
3:00Prediction of incident sporadic Alzheimer dementia: longitudinal biomarkers and clinical changesBeau Ances, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, MO, US
3:15
Multiple brain markers contribute to risk of progression on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in clinically normal older adultsTaylor Neal, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US
3:30Low levels of brain beta-amyloid predict tau deposition and memory decline in agingStephanie Leal, University of California, Berkeley, CA, US
3:45Discussion Session 9
4:15POSTER SESSION 3B and Coffee Break
5:00SESSION 10: AD-vascular interactionsCHAIRS:
Tammie Benzinger, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, MO, US
Sylvia Villeneuve, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
5:00Amyloid deposition, small-vessel disease accrual and neurodegeneration, and progression to Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in cognitively normal older adultsNeelesh Nadkarni, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, US
5:15The association of mid- and late-life systemic inflammation with brain amyloid deposition: atherosclerosis risk in communities-PET StudyKeenan Walker, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, US
5:30Beta-amyloid burden and vascular risk interact to predict neocortical tau PET signal in clinically normal older individualsJennifer Rabin, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US
5:45Discussion Session 10
6:05Awards Ceremony
6:15Closing NotesKeith Johnson, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US

The 17th Mild Cognitive Impairment Symposium and Special Topic Workshop (CME/CE accredited) will follow immediately on January 19-20, 2019 at the same venue. 

MCI website

2019 KEYNOTE LECTURES


MICHEL GOEDERT, MD, PhD

Dr. Goedert elucidated the events underlying the assembly of tau protein into the major fibrous component of lesions found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. He provided evidence for the genetic basis for the critical pathological event in the formation of Alzheimer’s disease lesions. He had also broken new ground by discovering alpha-synuclein protein in the lesions in the brains of people suffering from Parkinson’s disease.  His current work is aimed at developing experimental animal models of tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies and at identifying disease modifiers.

Goedert was awarded the Potamkin Prize in 1998 and the European Grand Prix for Research by the Foundation for Research on AD in 2014. In 2018 he was one of four recipients of the Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize with the citation “For their groundbreaking research on the genetic and molecular basis of Alzheimer’s disease, with far-reaching implications for the development of new therapeutic interventions as well as for the understanding of other neurodegenerative diseases of the brain”.

Michel Goedert received an M.D. from the University of Basel (Switzerland) and a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (United Kingdom). He has worked at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge as a Program Leader since 1984 and was Head (joint or sole) of its Neurobiology Division between 2003 and 2016. Since 2014, he has also been an Honorary Professor at Cambridge University. Goedert’s work combines biochemical, molecular biological and structural techniques to investigate common neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

JOHN TROJANOWSKI, MD, PhD

Dr. Trojanowski obtained his M.D./Ph.D. in 1976 from Tufts University in Boston. After a medicine internship at Mt. Auburn Hospital and Harvard Medical School, he began pathology/neuropathology training at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School (1977-1979), and completed training at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1980 where he was appointed assistant professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and rose to tenured full professor in 1990.

Dr. Trojanowski holds major leadership positions at the University of Pennsylvania including: Director of a National Institute of Aging (NIA) Alzheimer’s Disease Center (1991-present), Director (2002-present) of the Institute on Aging, Co-Director (1992-present) of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, named the first William Maul Measey -Truman G. Schnabel, Jr., M.D., Professor of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology in 2003 and Co-director of the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Drug Discovery Program.

For over 15 years, Dr. Trojanowski has conducted research on AD, PD, motor neuron disease, dementia with Lewy bodies , frontotemporal dementias and related disorders. Most of his 500+ publications focus on the pathobiology of neurodegenerative disorders, especially the role of abnormal filamentous protein aggregates in these diseases. Dr. Trojanowski received awards for his research including: a MERIT Award (1986-1994) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Metropolitan Life Foundation Promising Investigator Award For Alzheimer’s Disease Research (1991), membership in the American Society of Clinical Investigation (1991), an Established Investigator Award from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (1994), the Metropolitan Life Foundation Award For Alzheimer’s Disease Research (1996), the Potamkin Prize For Research In Pick’s, Alzheimer’s And Related Diseases (1998), the first Pioneer Award from the Alzheimer’s Association (1998), ISI Highly Cited Researcher 2000 (most highly cited neuroscientists for 1981-1999), the Stanley Cohen Biomedical Research Award of the University of Pennsylvania (2000), membership in the Association of American Physicians (2000), the 2004 Irving Wright Award of Distinction of the American Federation for Aging Research, and the 2005 Rous-Whipple Award of the American Society for Investigative Pathology. He was elected President of the American Association of Neuropathologists (1997-1998), and is on the editorial board of several neuroscience and pathology journals.

Dr. Trojanowski was elected to the Institute of Medicine (2002) and he has served and continues to serve on local and national aging research committees including the NIA Neuroscience, Behavior and Sociology of Aging Study Section (1987-1991), the National Advisory Council on Aging (NACA) of the NIA (1994-1998), the NACA Working Group Chair (1996-1998), the Medical and Scientific Advisory Board of the National Alzheimer’s Association (1994-1997) as well as of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association (1992- present), the NIA Board of Scientific Counselors (1998-present), the Scientific Advisory Boards of the Paul Beeson Physician Faculty Scholars In Aging Award (1998-present), the Alliance for Aging Research (2002-present) and the Association of Frontotemporal Dementia (2003-present), the Program Committee of the World Alzheimer Congress 2000 (1998-2000), Chair of the “Biology of Synuclein and Cortical Lewy Bodies Associated with Dementia in AD, LBD, and PD” (July, 2001) and “Genetics of Alzheimer’s Disease (March, 2002) workshops organized by NIA and the National Institute on Neurological Diseases and Stroke in Bethesda, Maryland, and the Organizing Committee of the 6th (Seville, Spain, 2003) and 7th (Sorrento, Italy, 2005) International Conferences On Progress In Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s Disease (2001-2005).